Ana de la Reguera in GQ Mexico Magazine photoshoot

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STORMTROOPERS (2018) Star Wars Fan Film

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STORMTROOPERS (2018) Stormtroopers is a fan film about a platoon of Stormtroopers who raid a remote Rebel Mining outpost. Stormtroopers was filmed in Ireland on location in Cork, Waterford & Tipperary. Stormtroopers stars Carolyn Bracken, Peter Cosgrove, Klancy Casey Williams, Micheal Fitzgerald, Michael Stack & Melissa Ciepierski. Stormtroopers is written & directed by Micheal Fitzgerald and was produced by Cork Racing. Cork based production and animation powerhouse Dog Day Media completed the VideoFX & Post-production. SoundFX Design by Alan Keogh. Film Original Score by Electric Foxx.

 

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Look at the exclusive Dolby Cinema poster for Marvel Studios’ AntMan and The Wasp

Look at the exclusive Dolby Cinema poster for Marvel Studios’ AntMan and The Wasp

Death Stranding E3 2018 Trailer

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From legendary game creator Hideo Kojima comes an all new, genre defining experience for the PlayStation®4. Besieged by death’s tide at every turn, Sam Bridges must brave a world utterly transformed by the Death Stranding. Carrying the stranded remnants of the future in his hands, Sam embarks on a journey to reunite the shattered world one step at a time. What is the mystery of the Death Stranding? What will Sam discover on the road ahead? A genre defining gameplay experience holds these answers and more.

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Resident Evil 2 – E3 2018 Announcement Trailer

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The genre-defining masterpiece Resident Evil 2 returns, completely re-built from the ground up for a deeper narrative experience. Using Capcom’s proprietary RE Engine, Resident Evil 2 offers a fresh take on the classic survival horror saga with breathtakingly realistic visuals, heart-poundingly immersive audio, a new over-the-shoulder camera, and modernized controls on top of gameplay modes from the original game. The nightmares return reimagined for the PlayStation®4 and PlayStation®4 Pro on January 25, 2019. In Resident Evil 2, the classic action, tense exploration, and puzzle solving gameplay that defined the Resident Evil series returns. Players join rookie police officer Leon Kennedy and college student Claire Redfield, who are thrust together by a disastrous outbreak in Raccoon City that transformed its population into deadly zombies. Both Leon and Claire have their own separate playable campaigns, allowing players to see the story from both characters’ perspectives. The fate of these two fan favorite characters is in players hands as they work together to survive and get to the bottom of what is behind the terrifying attack on the city. Will they make it out alive?

Toxic Fandom Is Killing ‘Star Wars’

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Fandom has always been an us versus them proposition. In the early days, it was because you loved something that the world at large found silly, be it comic books or Doctor Who. It was you and those who felt like you, against everyone else. Star Wars redefined fandom because it built a bigger tent than had ever existed before. Suddenly, the “everyone else” also loved Star Wars. Your mom knew what The Force was. Mark Hamill was on The Tonight Show. There was Yoda underwear. It was the first real “fan” thing that exploded into a phenomenon. But fandom always needs a “them.”

Star Wars is in an interesting place right now. The most recent film, Solo: A Star Wars Story, has been drastically underperforming at the box office. After two weeks in release, it had pulled in a mere $271 million worldwide. Analysts believe Disney will lose $50 million or more on the film, and Solo comes on the heels of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which — despite making $1.3 billion worldwide — proved itself an incredibly divisive film. While critics loved it (judging by the 91 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes), fans were split.

Some loved the bold liberties of writer-director Rian Johnson. They understood that there was room under that big tent for characters like Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern) and Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran), women placed alongside Carrie Fisher’s Leia and Ridley’s Rey at the center of the Star Wars drama.

But others hated it. Hated everything it stood for. Hated what they saw as a social justice warrior remix of the Star Wars they grew up with. And they hated Tran’s Rose most of all because they decided that she was the avatar for all that was wrong with the franchise. Those fans — a minority but a loud one — found their “them” in the very thing they used to love.

Those who chose this particular vein of the Dark Side, emboldened by the faceless intoxication of the internet, went hard on Tran. Racist invective, misogyny, rape and death threats all hurled at her constantly, unrelentingly, transforming what had been a Cinderella story — The Last Jedi was Tran’s first major film — into a modern-day nightmare. On June 4, she all but quit social media, stripping everything from her Instagram save for a profile picture and a bio that says “Afraid, but still doing it anyway.”

(It shouldn’t go unnoticed that when this stripe of fan decides they don’t like a new take on an old favorite, they level their hate on the woman of color. Leslie Jones bore the brunt of the backlash to the 2016 reboot of Ghostbusters and the racist, sexually violent tweets she got also caused her to withdraw from social media to find her balance.)

All of this raises the question: What exactly do Star Wars fans want? For so long, all they were asking for was more. It was 16 years between Return of the Jedi and The Phantom Menace, and then 10 years between Revenge of the Sith and The Force Awakens. Just getting Star Wars on the big screen was enough … at first. But then fans wheeled on the prequels: too much Jar Jar, too convoluted. (The vitriol was strong enough to chase Lucas away from directing and perhaps from Star Wars altogether.)

When J.J. Abrams signed on for The Force Awakens and built his narrative around a young woman with The Force and her black friend, it triggered the anti-SJW brigades. (Never mind it also gave them Han Solo, Chewbacca, Leia and a pair of familiar droids.) The #BoycottEpisodeVII hashtag spread, targeting Ridley and John Boyega, though it probably had more headlines than effect, as the film topped $2 billion worldwide.

But if The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi were too progressive for some fans, why didn’t they comfort themselves in the warm blanket of Solo, co-written by Star Wars standard-bearer Lawrence Kasdan and directed by Lucas’ Willow collaborator Ron Howard? It should’ve been everything they wanted in the prequels they didn’t get, without the “too many ladies and people of color” issues they claimed hurt the new films. But judging by the gross, they didn’t want Solo either.

What is Star Wars fandom against? Turns out, the answer: itself. Or, rather, the realization that Star Wars is and always has been for children, and they aren’t children any more. Star Wars fans — I count myself among them — look to the original trilogy as an anchor of youth. They want anything Star Wars to make them feel the way they did when they saw “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away …” roll across the screen 40 years ago.

No diehard fan wants to imagine himself as old Luke Skywalker, hiding on an island from everything new, anything that might shake his steadfast belief in how the world is supposed to be. But if you saw the original Star Wars in the theater, that’s who you are, unless you find a way to open yourself to heroes designed to hook a new generation while still resonating with yours. Those who haven’t are lashing out at everything that reminds them that they’re no longer young Luke, staring off into the horizon of a future still dawning, like twin suns.

They are forgetting the very things that spoke to them about Star Wars in the first place — and the warnings of a little green puppet about the perils of anger.

Marc Bernardin is a former THR editor and a comic book and television writer whose credits include Hulu’s upcoming Castle Rock. He also co-hosts the Fatman on Batman podcast with Kevin Smith.

 

via hollywoodreporter.com

Shadow of the Tomb Raider Gameplay Demo – E3 2018

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Shadow of the Tomb Raider is the upcoming sequel to Rise of the Tomb Raider, and third and allegedly final installment in the Survivor Timeline.

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Wolfenstein: Youngblood – Official E3 Teaser

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Wolfenstein: Youngblood is a brand-new co-op game unveiled at the Bethesda BE3 Showcase 2018. The game takes place in 1980, 19 years after BJ Blazkowicz ignited the second American Revolution in Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. Wolfenstein: Youngblood introduces the next Blazkowicz generation to the fight against the Nazis. Play as one of BJ’s twin daughters, Jess and Soph, as you search for your missing father in Nazi-occupied Paris. Wolfenstein: Youngblood will release in 2019.

Cyberpunk 2077 – official E3 2018 trailer

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Cyberpunk 2077 is one of the most-anticipated upcoming games of E3 2018, and so far developer CD Projekt Red (of Witcher fame), has been tight lipped about what the game will actually be like. However, at Microsoft’s E3’s press conference, the studio officially changed that by showing off the game and revealing some details about it.

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The press conference was about to end before being “hacked” to show the first full trailer. It opened with a narrator saying poverty and other social issues had made his city the worst place to live, and yet, everyone wants to be there. It then showed a train emerging into a dazzling city of dreams, a metropolis of giant buildings adorned with dazzling screens, where organic skin is meshed with futuristic tech. The narrator describes himself as a “dreamer” before opening a case with a rifle in it. Viewers were then treated to montage of violence, with punk-stylised figures brutally attacking each other.

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To understand Cyberpunk 2077, you first have to know Cyberpunk 2020. The latter was a beloved role-playing game from the late 1980s and early 1990s that incorporated many of the cyberpunk tropes. There’s cybernetic enhancement, nefarious corporations, devious punk rock hackers, neo-noir aesthetics, freaky future drugs and trench coats. So many trench coats.

In the world of 2020, the US sits at the mercy of megacorporations after the world basically goes to hell. These megacorps become fiefdoms with their own areas of interest and secret plots to gain dominion over the others. Within that combative environment rests California’s Night City, where players would play out their adventures as corporate raiders, rebel rock-and-roll stars, street doctors or cyborg plain-old assassins.

Though Cyberpunk itself has fallen in popularity, its influence can be seen in everything from the most recent Blade Runner to the (soon-to-be-defunct) Android: Netrunner card game. Cyberpunk 2077 would pick up the series 50-plus years later, with the trailer hinting at robotics far advanced beyond what was seen in the original pen-and-paper RPG. And beyond things looking appropriately cyberpunk-y, the state of the world and the many megacorps is pretty much unknown.

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Devil May Cry 5 – Announcement Trailer

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Devil May Cry 5 comes to Xbox One in Spring 2019 with Xbox One X Enhanced, HDR, and 4K capabilities! The devil you know returns in the most over the top, technically advanced, utterly insane action experience of this generation.